how to teach visual learners title cover

How to Teach Visual Learners

In the modern world, we’re now well-aware that there are different types of learners and that their method of absorbing information differs quite vastly from each other. Despite this, most schools still follow the old, slightly outdated readings/lecture style of teaching, something that has been, time and again, proven to be ineffective in a class with students of differing learning styles.

Which isn’t to say that lectures are ineffective on their own, it’s just that most schools employ this strategy alone. However, it’s important to understand how each student processes data in order to create a teaching strategy that benefits all.

Different Types of Learners


The idea that different students learn differently started in the 1970’s, with David Kolb’s Experiential Model theory that broke down learning styles into 4 categories: Accommodator, Converger, Diverger, Assimilator. Over time, other educational theorists –like Peter Honey, Neil Fleming, Alan Mumford, et al –contributed to the idea of different learning styles and came up with competing, but complementary, theories. The most commonly accepted model of learning styles today breaks it down into 7 categories:

  • Visual: focuses on spatial understanding
  • Aural: focuses on sounds, music
  • Verbal: focuses on words, speech, and writing
  • Physical: focuses on kinetic movement, textures
  • Logical: focuses on logical reasoning
  • Social: focuses on learning in groups
  • Solitary: focuses on self-study

Each category has specific teaching strategies that go with it. For this article, we focus on the visual learner.

visual learner

Why Visual Learners Struggle

In many schools, the primary way of teaching is still heavily dependent on completing readings and sitting through lectures. Again, this is not an ineffective or inefficient way to teach per se, but for visual learners, it is a struggle to get through a class that focuses entirely on learning via speech.

Visual learners are at their best when they’re given an illustration or visual stimuli from which their brains can start creating stories and narratives. For a visual learner, auditory cues and instructions aren’t processed as fast as with other learners. Lectures can be the bane of visual learners, as the lack of visual stimuli for them means that they’re not going to be interpreting data as much as if there were some kind of visual aid.

When it comes to learning styles, visual learners tend to process data step by step via an analytical process. This means that, theoretically, they can do very well with reading, as the language organization skills of visual learners are better than most.

Although reading does have a visual aspect to it, the repetitiveness of symbols (letters) and the forced memorization of their correct sequence can dishearten a visual learner. Learning in this way can hold back a student whose brain is wired differently, and craves creativity and more dynamic visual stimuli.

Different Ways to Stimulate Visual Learners

ways to stimulate visual learners

Visual learners in the classroom thrive when there are various types of visual stimuli integrated into the lesson. By integrating visuals with a student’s memorization of symbols, we can tap into their visual cortex and engage visual learners without alienating aural and verbal learners. Visuals with symbols (or, in layman’s terms, pictures with words) help visual learners retain information by creating a mental photo for them to remember. When choosing classroom activities, whether it’s for visual learners or other learning styles, try to incorporate as many stimuli as possible so that it reaches and engages as many students as possible. Other strategies can include:

Sight Words

As visual learners rely heavily on their eyes to receive and process data, sight words are one of the most effective activities for visual learners. Sight words are commonly used words that young children are usually taught to memorize as a whole by sight. Broken down into learning the alphabet, educators can use visuals to represent different letters (i.e., the word MOUNTAIN can be drawn as actual mountains in order to provide the student with a visual shape to remember) while still teaching them how each word is sounded out.

Sight words help visual learners and other types of learners because it incorporates multiple learning styles (i.e. visual, verbal, aural, physical, and logical) that ensure no one is left behind.

Alphabet Teaching Cards

Alphabet teaching cards are a great visual guide for educators to engage visual learners along with the rest of the class. Teaching cards like these have colorful pictures that can be used to tell stories. By telling a story using visual aids, speech, audio guides, and even kinetic movement (like dancing or role-playing), you engage visual learners to memorize words and whole sentences by creating a mental “movie” that they can replay in their heads. Using all 4 learning styles at the same time engages the student’s cerebellum more intensely, thereby maximizing their ability to retain the information you’re teaching them.

Again, this type of teaching tool allows students of different learning styles to pick up on the lesson because it engages different senses: visual learners are engaged because it’s visual stimuli, verbal learners learn through the audio guide, physical learners get a feel of the cards which help them remember the lesson, social learners are able to enjoy the lesson because of the interaction the cards have, and even self-learners are able to self-study the lesson if they’re allowed to take home the cards.

Fingermapping

Fingermapping involves using your fingers to represent individual sounds or letters in a word. This technique helps young students, particularly those in pre-school or kindergarten, learn how to correctly sequence specific sounds in a word that they are writing. For visual learners, this is a crucial element for them to literally see the sound of each letter and aiding them in correctly writing down that word. Think of it as giving a map to somebody who has a hard time following verbal instructions: it engages both their visual skills, their auditory skills, their need for speech, their kinetic intelligence, as well as engaging their logical processes.

As a classroom activity, visual learners are able to learn because it gives them a visual aid on how a word works, while physical and social learners are able to be engaged because of the interactive portion of fingermapping. Meanwhile, logical learners are able to learn because fingermapping requires a lot of logical processing.

Markers and Whiteboards

using markers to teach class

Particularly for young students, these tools can be very helpful in aiding them with their reading skills. Although there’s nothing wrong with the use of pencils and paper, it can be a little difficult for some children who are still developing fine motor skills. By using mini whiteboards and markers, you’re able to include all manner of learning styles: the tactile element of holding a whiteboard and a marker gives kinetic learners a great feel of words you’ll be spelling out, while visual and auditory learners are able to see and hear the words they’re writing down. Using oversized markers can also help students develop their fine motor skills. You can reduce the size of these markers over time while still incorporating a visual and kinetic aspect to your lessons.

When using markers and whiteboards for your lessons, make sure you’re able to incorporate visual aids, auditory directions, kinetic motion, logical requirements, social interaction, verbally reading out what they write, and allow them an opportunity to study what they’ve just learned in solitude.

Teaching Patterns in Words

The human brain is predisposed to seeing patterns; it’s our way of making sense of an otherwise chaotic world. For young students, learning the pattern of a particular language’s vocabulary and lexicon are important tools in becoming fluent. When teaching sounds or spelling, it is best to include more than one example of a particular word. In this way, you show students that language has a pattern, and once they see this pattern, it becomes a part of their cognitive process. For visual learners, this is a crucial element to their learning system, and will be invaluable for them in the future.

Again, language organization is one of the strengths of visual learners because it engages their logical process through visual stimuli, allowing them to ‘see’ how words are constructed and how each word logically follows or precedes another. This helps them map out complete patterns in their head.

educators

Keep Your Teaching Style (and Your Teaching Tools) Flexible

In as much as students need to be flexible when learning, educators must also learn how to be flexible with their teaching. As much as possible, create a teaching style that incorporates various types of learning styles so as not to exclude anyone. If possible, remain flexible with how you teach, especially if you are teaching different grades.

As much as possible, use teaching tools that are holistic and meets the diverse needs of you students. In this way, teachers are able to teach students of different learning styles without having to prepare different materials every time. By using teaching tools that require different logical and physical processes from the child, teachers can ensure that every student benefits from the lesson.

Incorporating different teaching styles for different learning styles can be an exciting and fulfilling strategy, especially when you see students retaining information and actually enjoying their lessons.

Following Up With Clients Without Being Annoying

Business men talking in the phone

Following up with clients is not just another day-to-day activity that you should fulfil. A lot of account managers and client services personnel overlook the importance of this very activity. When that happens, they become lax with their dealings, especially if the clients they are handling have been with them for a long time. This should not be the case, knowing that being complacent can endanger relationships and will even cost you your business.

You need to keep in mind that your clients are your sources of business. You have to make sure that your clients are properly serviced. The satisfaction they get from your solutions and services will help secure repeat business. When it comes to this, you need to master the art of talking to your clients, something that you may learn from thorough account management training in the UK.

Here are some of the things to keep in mind when following up with your clients and prospects.

Back up your invitation with information

You may have already talked to your client. Meet-ups may have been fulfilled. If you wish to follow up with your client, you should do it by letting some time pass by. When the time has come, you may want to restate your invitation or offer. Nevertheless, the recap should have backup information that will help them arrive at a decision. The information should be brief and concise. If you are sending e-mail, you may want to include a link where your client can learn more about your offer.

Emphasise your offer’s strengths

Man on his phone

When you are doing a recap of your offer, one thing that will make your client read and appreciate your follow-up would be the things that have made them excited. One sign that your client is excited about your offer is the many questions they ask you. This is something you can only do when you already have an initial meeting with them and that you have seen firsthand that they are crazy about your company’s offerings. That way, they may inquire about your offerings again.

Ask them

It is hard to read between the lines, so it pays to be straightforward. After explaining your offerings or proposals, you can always ask them about the best time you should follow up. This favours them, but you need to gauge your client, as going this route may make them feel pressured.

Be patient

You may feel that the client has forgotten about your proposal or offer, but if it takes some time before the client reverts to you, you will need to be patient. Keep in mind that your client may be a busy person who attends to many things. In this case, you will need to be patient. Impatience may cost you many things, so stay calm, and carry on with your other activities.

These are just some of the things to keep in mind if you want to follow up with your clients without being annoying. Schedule your follow-ups wisely.

Read more at Educomics.

IT Professional showing data to managers

Cities in the Carolinas Are Among Best Places for IT Professionals

A CompTIA analysis showed that cities in North Carolina and Texas are among the top 20 best places for IT professionals for this year, based on job growth and the ratio of average salaries to the cost of living.

The study also based its rankings on the employment outlook for the next 12 months and five years. The Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia region in The Carolinas ranked above other cities in the country. IT workers in the area earn more than $87,000 per year, and the cost of living there is 1.3% lower than the national average. In the next five years, job growth is estimated to grow at 11%.

Why the Carolinas Rank on Top

In the last 12 months, the Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia region added over 44,000 jobs including those in the IT sector. Large companies such as Accenture, Bank of America, Deloitte and Wells Fargo are part of the reason for CompTIA’s favorable outlook on the industry.

Raleigh in North Carolina ranked as the second-best place with a projected job growth of 11% by 2023. The median annual salary may be slightly smaller at around $87,000, but professionals may have more spending power as the cost of living is 3.5% cheaper than the U.S. average. The Silicon Valley joined the list, but the cost of living there somehow negates the six-figure average salaries.

High Cost of Living

The average salary for IT professionals in San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward in California cost around $110,500, but the cost of living is 64.2% higher than the national average. Job growth is expected to grow by 15% in the next five years, as evidenced by the increasing need for workers from different companies. In fact, local employers added more than 112,000 IT jobs from August 2017 to July 2018 alone.

programmer coding on computerThe cost of living in San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara is also 43.6% higher than the national average. However, it helps that IT employees have the highest salary among the top 20 places at an average of more than $122,000. If you can handle the competition and manage to live within your budget, this place could be perfect for you. Another option includes having the right skills and certification to enhance your market value. Entry-level professionals could improve their credentials with beginner-level certificates such as Network+ N10-007.

Best Country in Terms of Salary

Certified professionals have better chances of landing a higher-paying role in an industry where the average salary ranges between $100,000 and $125,000. A survey showed that IT workers in the U.S. earn more than their counterparts in the world.

Those in the Asia-Pacific region are catching up with average salaries amounting up to $100,000. Employers in Japan and Singapore are particularly willing to pay more to increase their competency on the global market.

Before you plan to relocate in another city or country, you should consider if you can compete in your destination’s job market. While experience plays a significant role, having the right industry certification increases your chances of becoming hireable among different employers. Some companies even require specific certificates depending on the advertised position.

HR having a good talk with an applicant

5 Tips to Increase Your Chances of Getting Hired

If you’ve been preparing for your next job interview for logistics jobs you have applied for, you might have done your research on things that you shouldn’t do in an interview. However, the things that you should do might be different from what you might expect.

It’s a challenge to be persuasive without becoming too aggressive. Most of the time, we even tend to forget the basic ideas during the actual interview. So, to help you make a great first impression, here are a few things that can help you prepare for a job interview.

1. Research about the company

The first thing that you need to do is to find as much information as you can about the company. You can go through their official websites as well as a few editorials written about the company.

You can also review a few of their current projects as well as their plans. Doing so will help you demonstrate your knowledge of the business during your job interview.

2. Prepare copies of your documents

You need to make copies of your resume and other vital documents prior to your interview date. Doing so will help you get things organized so you won’t be scrambling to have your materials ready during the day of your interview.

3. Prepare for the questions
HR listening to an applicant

You need to prepare for the questions before the day of your interview. You can try to search the internet for a few commonly asked questions during a job interview to help you prepare. One of the most common questions asked during an interview is if you’re fit for the job or not.

Instead of merely saying yes, try expounding your answer by providing real-life scenarios. You should tailor your anecdotes based on the job opening. You also need to explain how you’ll add value to the company and help them rise to the top.

4. Dress appropriately

Getting into your formal wear is a must whenever you’re attending for a job interview. Men, if you don’t have a suit for your interview, then wearing a clean and crisp dress shirt while pairing it up with your favorite slacks is okay, too.

Meanwhile, women can’t go wrong with trousers, blazer, a beautiful blouse, and a pencil skirt. You can still wear accessories but ensure that you won’t look tacky.

5. Don’t skip a meal

Most candidates often make the same mistake of not eating during the day of their interview. However, doing so can cause them to become less attentive during the job interview.

So, before you proceed, it’s best to eat a full meal that contains all the nutrients that you need to get through the day. Eating a complete and well-balanced meal can help boost your brain functionality which makes you more alert.

Attending a job interview is a huge step to landing a job. That’s why it’s best to do everything that you can to prepare for it. Learn as much as you can about the company before the interview to increase your chances of getting hired.